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“Quality of Life, Spirit of Place”

 

Vermont Views Magazine

Home Page

Features

Articles

Columns


Meanderings

Early days of August

Charles Monette


Urban Naturalist

Black Vultures

Lloyd Graf


Open Mind

3 to 5 minutes on racial justice, no thanks

Offie Wortham


Write Walk

Jolene - A Short-Story told in Parts — Part 2

Susan Cruickshank


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Toward Restoring the Republic

Jeri Rose


Finnish Fandango

R & B IN THE US

Anneli Karniala


Love In Action

The RBG Effect

Elizabeth Hill


An A-musing Life

A Tale for Today

Nanci Bern


Water’s Edge

Arriving

Nicola Metcalf


Old Lady Blog

August 12, 2020

Toni Ortner


Dairy Home Companion

#7• Neu Carz•


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

The Universal Field in Practice

Jeri Rose


Write Walk

Jolene - A Short-Story told in Parts — Part 1

Susan Cruickshank


Monkey’s Cloak

Listening to vibrations

Charles Monette


Finnish Fandango

A SEA CHANGE FROM FEAR

Anneli Karniala


Love In Action

Entering a Brand New Portal

Elizabeth Hill


Dairy Home Companion

#6•News from Hunger Ground Zero•


Write Walk

River-Bottom Dirt and an Innocent Canoe

Susan Cruickshank


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Flashback

Jeri Rose


Meanderings

Jesi’s stone

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Transforming Us

A tribute to John Lewis

Elizabeth Hill


Dairy Home Companion

#5•Soup Kitchen + Taboo Inquiry•


Pandemic Journal

A Graphic Journal Slide Show

Linda Rubinstein


Water’s Edge

The Ugly Iris

Nicola Metcalf


Selected Letters

Nurses Have Rights Too

(Or Should)

Rob Mitchell


Write Walk

Life is Uncomfortable

Susan Cruickshank


Old Lady Blog

Swimmer & The River Styx

Toni Ortner


The First Glass

Semmelweis — a book review

Vincent Panella


Open Mind

Understand the anger

Offie Wortham


Love In Action

An American Life Full of Grace

Elizabeth Hill


An A-musing Life

I have become very stupid

Nanci Bern


Write Walk

The Three Amigos

Susan Cruickshank


Finnish Fandango

A  NEW  NORMAL  LEXICON

Anneli Karniala


Dairy Home Companion

#4•Ups and Downs•

#3•Jig and Drabble•

#2•baby talk•

#1•Paradise Postponed•


Meanderings

Mountain is open

Charles Monette


Old Lady Blog

•a series•

March 28, 2020 — Rome Frozen

Toni Ortner


Love In Action

A Lovely Little Thing Called Hope

Elizabeth Hill


Write Walk

Paper-Bag Crowns & the Pandemic Anniversary

Susan Cruickshank


Selected Letters

Nurses Have Rights Too

(Or Should)

Rob Mitchell


Monkey’s Cloak

Facetime goodbye

Charles Monette


An A-musing Life

Entering the Space

Between Us

Nanci Bern


Love In Action

After New Zealand — A Series of Vignettes from Soul to Soul

#3 Look to The Rainbow

Elizabeth Hill


Meanderings

Meandering in place

Charles Monette


The First Glass

My grandmother died of the Spanish Flu

Vincent Panella


Finnish Fandango

IMAGINE  A  WATERFALL

Anneli Karniala


Write Walk

Hip Hip Hooray!

Susan Cruickshank


Vermont Diary

What about your contribution?


in between

BRIDGING BACK TO LOVE

Julia Ferarri


Love In Action

After New Zealand — A Series of Vignettes from Soul to Soul

Glow Worms- Who Knew?

Elizabeth Hill


Open Mind

Paid Sick Leave

Offie Wortham


Vermont Diary

Bernie in the age of

corona-virus


Write Walk

Darwin’s Theory of Adaption and My Crampons

Susan Cruickshank


Meanderings

Dust of Winter

Charles Monette


Open Mind

My brother Lonnie

Offie Wortham


Love In Action

After New Zealand — A Series of Vignettes from Soul to Soul

Elizabeth Hill


Monkey’s Cloak

saturday’s quiet morn

Charles Monette


Water’s Edge

OCEANS RISING

Nicola Metcalf


Write On!

Why is Martin Luther King Day a day off from school?

Offie Wortham


Write Walk

The Glimmering Tail of the In-Between

Susan Cruickshank


The First Glass

POOL

Vincent Panella



Vermont Diary

Wurz that?


An A-musing Life

Pass the Abundance Please, It's Next to The Holiday Pie

Nanci Bern


Selected Letters

Letter from Australia

Annie Matthews


Love In Action

Welcome Bay and Beyond

Elizabeth Hill


The First Glass

A book review

Vincent Panella


Meanderings

Broken twigs on snow

Charles Monette


Write Walk

Forging a Relationship with Fire

Susan Cruickshank


Finnish Fandango

IT'S ABSOLUTELY FREE !

Anneli Karniala


Monkey’s Cloak

A Gift for the Season

Jeri Rose


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Growing Up

Jeri Rose


Our Man In

Findhorn Foundation

Doug Hoyt


Vermont Diary

There are Four Seasons


Love In Action

A Walk Around the Block with Mister Rogers

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Authors Reviewed

The Animal One Thousand Miles Long: Seven Lengths of Vermont and Other Adventures — by Leath Tonino

Laura Stevenson


Write On!

Slow travel plans for the holidays

Charles Monette


Monkey’s Cloak

boy child

Charles Monette


Open Mind

So far it’s been a good run

Offie Wortham


On My Walks

Three New Images

Kate Hill Cantrill


Love In Action

Draining The Swamp at 510

Elizabeth Hill


An A-musing Life

Love’s Grace

Nanci Bern


Write Walk

Fall Epiphany

Susan Cruickshank


Meanderings

Tale of two skies

Charles Monette


Real Vermont Stories

Vermont “Maternity Homes”

Beth Kanell


Meanderings

eco-virtue, eco-ethos, eco-sin

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Resurrecting The Grail

Elizabeth Hill


Finnish Fandango

WHAT HAPPENED TO FRUGALITY?

Anneli Karniala


Write Walk

Django

Susan Cruickshank


On My Walks

One Art,

Elizabeth Bishop

Kate Hill Cantrill


Meanderings

In striking contrast

Charles Monette


Water’s Edge

Burying Roger

Nicola Metcalf


How I Write

2019

Publisher Challenge Essays

Vincent Panella


Vermont Authors Reviewed

Tony Weldon,

Drunk in the woods

Laura Stevenson


Love In Action

Ruminations From the

Yellow Brick Road

Elizabeth Hill


Write Walk

The Recipe

Susan Cruickshank


Monkey’s Cloak

Encase the world in iron

Charles Monette


Finnish Fandango

The Funeral

Anneli Karniala


Selected Letters

5,000 Vermonters at risk

Emily Cohen


Meanderings

Stones kicking back

Charles Monette


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Facets of Woo Woo

Jeri Rose


Love In Action

A Bowl of Cherries

Elizabeth Hill


Write Walk

The Fickleness of the Toronto Coffee Society

Susan Cruickshank


Real Vermont Stories

Two Kinds of Truth

Beth Kanell


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

A short recollection from fifty years ago

Jeri Rose


in between

How Very Rich and

Deep our Lives

Julia Ferarri


Love In Action

You and Me

Elizabeth Hill


Write Walk

Green Mountain Mourning

Susan Cruickshank


Monkey’s Cloak

Mexico City closed today

Charles Monette


Meanderings

Mountain laurels in June, mountain laurels in bloom

Charles Monette


An A-musing Life

The Vital Un-Silencing

Nanci Bern


Old Lady Blog

Two Pieces

Toni Ortner


Real Vermont Stories

Real or Not Real? Famous Words of the Vermont Supreme Court

Beth Kanell


Our Man In

Kilkenny, Ireland

Doug Hoyt


Finnish Fandango

Watching the maestro

Anneli Karniala


Love In Action

The Hills of Nova Scotia

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Authors Reviewed

Beth Kanell, The Long Shadow

Laura Stevenson


Selected Letters

Blurb Writers At The Edge

Distler, Mayo, Innes


Water’s Edge

Walmart Universe

Nicola Metcalf


Write Walk

Random Birthdays

Susan Cruickshank


Meanderings

Another foggy morning

Charles Monette


Our Man In

Kilkenny, Ireland

Doug Hoyt


Write On!

George and Agnes

Howard Prussack


Meanderings

River of the Lonely Way

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Special

Elizabeth Hill


Open Mind

“When will they ever learn, when will they ever learn?”

A major essay;

part 3 of 4

The Immigration Act of 1924, or Johnson–Reed Act, including the Asian Exclusion Act and National Origins Act

Offie Wortham


Write Walk

Uncle Paul, Big Macs

& Thank You’s

Susan Cruickshank


Monkey’s Cloak

A robot picked my strawberry today

Charles Monette


Meanderings

Into the grey

Charles Monette


Meanderings

Mud bumps of April

Charles Monette


The First Glass

Speech to the congregation

Vincent Panella


Write Walk

Mud

Susan Cruickshank


Love In Action

Red-Handed

Elizabeth Hill


Finnish Fandango

TO READ OR NOT TO READ!

Anneli Karniala


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Division Tactics

Jeri Rose


SCREENplay

Wildlife

Lawrence Klepp


World & US Energy News

Environment there and here, Special Report by Phil Innes

Phil Innes


Old Lady Blog

Trapped, part II

Toni Ortner


Urban Naturalist

A Loud and Colorful Advance Party Marks the End of Hogle Sanctuary's Winter Silence

Lloyd Graf


Monkey’s Cloak

And Still

Phil Innes


Open Mind

What is Trump’s “Base”?

Offie Wortham


Old Lady Blog

Trapped

Toni Ortner


Water’s Edge

Two Knives

Nicola Metcalf


Love In Action

Dance Everybody Dance

Elizabeth Hill


Open Mind

Why are 380 people in prison in Vermont without a trial?

Offie Wortham


SCREENplay

At Eternity’s Gate

Lawrence Klepp


Monkey’s Cloak

All’s relative

Charles Monette


Meanderings

February thermoplasticity

Charles Monette


Finnish Fandango

SAFETY IN NUMBERS?

Anneli Karniala


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Lessons We Must Learn

Jeri Rose


SCREENplay

Stan and Ollie

Lawrence Klepp


in between

What In your Life

is Calling You?

Julia Ferarri


Love In Action

ElizaVanGoghbeth

Elizabeth Hill


Monkey’s Cloak

Kairos

Phil Innes


Write On!

Unpacking Weaponized Masculinity

Greg Hessel


Vermont Diary

Five Chill Words


From The Archive

Evolution of democracy from economy to ecology


Water’s Edge

Ruminations on Kale

Nicola Metcalf


Vermont Diary

490 — a Record!


Vermont Diary

Caravanserai


Write Walk

Auld Lang Syne

Susan Cruickshank


Monkey’s Cloak

Ultima thule

Charles Monette


Open Mind

Transcultural Awareness Dining

Offie Wortham


Love In Action

A Ladybug’s New Year

Elizabeth Hill


An A-musing Life

One Moment, Please

Nanci Bern


Open Mind

Secret Voting in Congress, The Answer to the Gridlock

Offie Wortham


FOODISH

Scandinavian Christmas Dishes

Feature Article

Anneli Karniala


Vermont Diary

Newz and the perennial season


Meanderings

Sunday quiet

Charles Monette


Finnish Fandango

WHAT'S THE RUSH?

Anneli Karniala


in between

An Encroaching Lawlessness

Julia Ferarri


Water’s Edge

Morning on the Mountain

Nicola Metcalf


Old Lady Blog

For the gardener who is gone

Toni Ortner


Meanderings

Moments of Silence

Charles Monette


Write Walk

Shower Etiquette

Susan Cruickshank


Love In Action

Choosing Hope

Elizabeth Hill


Monkey’s Cloak

Walls Have Ears

Alan Rayner


SCREENplay

Can You Ever Forgive Me?

Lawrence Klepp


Water’s Edge

Italian Impressions

Nicola Metcalf


Urban Naturalist

An Austere Hogle Sanctuary Sleeps in Beneath a Chill Sunday Morning Sun

Lloyd Graf


Write Walk

Apple Cottage Cheese Pancakes

Susan Cruickshank


Open Mind

Why do we really have a drug problem in Vermont?

Offie Wortham


SCREENplay

Colette

Lawrence Klepp


Love In Action

Of Home

Elizabeth Hill


Monkey’s Cloak

a rainbow swirling jet stream

Charles Monette


Finnish Fandango

Apple-bobbing and Remembering the Dead

Anneli Karniala


An A-musing Life

Witch Hat To Wear

Nanci Bern


Write On!

TYRANT!

Phil Innes


The First Glass

TEXAS TOAST, VOLUNTEERING FOR BETO — Parts I & 2

Vincent Panella


Vermont Diary

Has Bean Has Travelled


Meanderings

Apache foggy morning

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Spiritual Smorgasbord for Soul Sisters

Elizabeth Hill


Finnish Fandango

BUT (YOU SAY) IT'S ONLY A BOOK !

Anneli Karniala


Write Walk

Where’s the Gravy?

Susan Cruickshank


Vermont Diary

Twelve Good Men


World & US Energy News

Just one day in the energy life of the planet

September 2018

George Harvey


Selected Letters

Why I chose to look ugly, and the reasoning behind it.

Susan Polgar


SCREENplay

The Wife

Lawrence Klepp


Finnish Fandango

Got Milk? --

Not this kind, you don't!

Anneli Karniala


The First Glass

Typewriter days

Vincent Panella


Meanderings

Beyond the bees

Charles Monette


Old Lady Blog

Focused Light from a Different Star


Part 1 Self Portrait Frida Kahlo 1940

Creation of the Birds


Part 2 Remedios Varo 1958


Part 3 Join, Elizabeth Murray, 1980


Part 4 IXI by Susan Rothenberg 1977


Part 5 The Artist’s Wife in the Garden at Skagen 1893


Part 6 Gathering Paradise, Sandy Skoglund, 1991,

color Cibachrome photograph


Part 7 The Savage Sparkler, Alice Aycock, 1981, steel, sheet metal, heating coils, florescent lights, motors and fans

Toni Ortner


Water’s Edge

A Touch is All it Takes

Nicola Metcalf


Write Walk

Ladies I Need Your Help

Susan Cruickshank


Gallery One

#1 Sennen

#2 Surfing at Portreath

#3 Air Mail?

#4 Tall Ship at the Brixham Pirate Fest

#5 You can’t have a pirate ship without pirates

Anne Lenten, Ed.


Love In Action

Rainbow Connections

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

Woodier


Urban Naturalist

Blink little fire-beetle, flash and glimmer

Lloyd Graf


Monkey’s Cloak

You Can’t Do That

Charles Monette


Selected Letters

How To Evaporate Hate?

Black Panther meets Klansman

Offie Wortham and Curtiss Reed Jr.


in between

Losing the Garden

Julia Ferarri


Write Walk EXTRA

Rabid Fan & Conversion

Susan Cruickshank


Finnish Fandango

Crossing The Finnish Line

Anneli Karniala


Meanderings

The Blazing Sun

Charles Monette


Love In Action

To Have a Piece of Cake

Elizabeth Hill


Write Walk

Is that You Aunt Helen?

Susan Cruickshank


An A-musing Life

Letting if flow

Nanci Bern


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Lessons We Must Learn

Jeri Rose


Monkey’s Cloak

hell to swelter

Charles Monette


The First Glass

Sleeping With Herodotus

Vincent Panella


Water’s Edge

Maine morning

Nicola Metcalf


Selected Letters

How Can an Educated Person be Poor in Our Affluent Society?

Anonymous


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

“Thus, I was of the opinion...”

Jeri Rose


Open Mind

Affirmative Action should be based on Need not Race!

Offie Wortham


Love In Action

Mother and Child

Elizabeth Hill


SCREENplay

Ten Minute Plays

Lawrence Klepp


Meanderings

Understory vines

Charles Monette


An A-musing Life

Of hippos and their snacks

Nanci Bern


Write Walk

I See You

Susan Cruickshank


Love In Action

Fifty Years of Gratitude in One Beautiful Weekend

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

Don’t free Tibet, yet


Monkey’s Cloak

to Mother Teresa

András Adorján


Selected Letters

Compassion is volunteering to feed the hungry

Jane Southworth


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Perfect

Jeri Rose


in between

Searching For All the Moments We Put on Hold

Julia Ferarri


Open Mind

So what is Donald Trump

Offie Wortham


Write Walk

Fake News & Side-Seams

Susan Cruickshank


Write On!

In Light of Pee

Nicola Metcalf


Love In Action

May Hem at 510

Elizabeth Hill


Old Lady Blog

Horoscope & Water Wars

Toni Ortner


Meanderings

Here comes the sun

Charles Monette


Monkey’s Cloak

I set myself afire

Charles Monette


Write Walk

barking soliloquies

Susan Cruickshank


SCREENplay

Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool

Lawrence Klepp


Love In Action

Blooming through the gloaming

Elizabeth Hill


Monkey’s Cloak

Ode to a Goddess

Charles Monette


Open Mind

Black Man/Black Panther

Offie Wortham


Meanderings

Peaceful

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Shawabty and Snowdrops

Elizabeth Hill


SCREENplay

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Lawrence Klepp


Monkey’s Cloak

I’ll stay here till I get here

Charles Monette


Old Lady Blog

Writer and Agent

Toni Ortner


Vermont Diary

The American Way


Guest Column

Covered Bridge Cathedral

Susan Cruickshank


SCREENplay

The Darkest Hour

Lawrence Klepp


Love In Action

Not So Plain Jane

Elizabeth Hill


An A-musing Life

The Resolution Revolution

Nanci Bern


Write Walk

The Man on Newfane Hill

Susan Cruickshank


Guest Article

LETTERS FROM CUBA — 15

Some sentences from Cuba

Mac Gander


Guest Article

LETTERS FROM CUBA — 13

What’s time to a shoat?

Shanta Lee Gander


Open Mind

“Social Relationships”

Offie Wortham


Monkey’s Cloak

Untitled

Phil Innes


Vermont Diary

Like a Dan Shore Report


Love In Action

My Weekend with Lenny

Elizabeth Hill


The First Glass

This Poet Walks Into A Bar...

Vincent Panella


SCREENplay

Lady Bird

Lawrence Klepp


Monkey’s Cloak

Whither the storm?

Todd Vincent Crosby


Urban Naturalist

“...spanning 6 1/2 to 7 feet”

Lloyd Graf


Vermont Diary

Women,

you can’t get there from here


Selected Letters

Who do fools fall in love — Letter from a friend

Offie Wortham


Open Mind

Multiculturalism is the opposite of Integration

Offie Wortham


Love In Action

The Fruitcake Caper

Elizabeth Hill


in between

OUR EXPECTATIONS

Julia Ferarri


An A-musing Life

Cut To The Core

Nanci Bern


Monkey’s Cloak

75 at tea

Todd Vincent Crosby


SCREENplay

Wonderstruck

Lawrence Klepp


Monkey’s Cloak

All souls’ elegy

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Little Miss Buster

Elizabeth Hill


Old Lady Blog

Gapstow Bridge

Toni Ortner


Urban Naturalist

A Slow Day at Hogle Sanctuary is Salvaged by a Furry Visitor's Aquatic Star Turn

Lloyd Graf


Monkey’s Cloak

You cancelled your vacation

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Thay

Elizabeth Hill


Meanderings

Light footprints

Charles Monette


An A-musing Life

A Remembrance of Yom Kippur Angels and the Dancing Rabbi

Nanci Bern


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Bread and Circuses 

Jeri Rose


The First Glass

DEMOLITION

Vincent Panella


Urban Naturalist

Nighthawks

Lloyd Graf


SCREENplay

Wind River

Lawrence Klepp


Old Lady Blog

A Cross By The Sea

Toni Ortner


Love In Action

A Man Named Shin

Elizabeth Hill


Meanderings

Full Circle Meander

Charles Monette


Selected Letters

A Rational Solution to our Dilemma in Afghanistan.

Offie Wortham


An A-musing Life

Charlottesville

The Heart of the Serpent

Nanci Bern


Monkey’s Cloak

Malvern Hill

Charles Monette


SCREENplay

Dunkirk

Lawrence Klepp


Open Mind

So Who Came

To Your Funeral?

Offie Wortham


Monkey’s Cloak

Cicero’s Hands

Mike Murray


Open Mind

2030 — a short story

Offie Wortham


Love In Action

How To Fold A Presby Cap

Elizabeth Hill


Meanderings

A July summer’s midday morn

Charles Monette


in between

Reflection

Julia Ferarri


An A-musing Life

The Art of Flight

Nanci Bern


Vermont Diary

For The Birds


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Jumping Through Time

in My Life

Jeri Rose


Love In Action

Baby Buddha

Elizabeth Hill


Open Mind

A Transcultural Awareness Experience

Offie Wortham


Old Lady Blog

A Blackbird with Snow Covered Red Hills 1946

for Georgia O’Keefe

Toni Ortner


Monkey’s Cloak

overflowingly so

Charles Monette


The First Glass

John Dante’s Inferno,

A Playboy’s Life -

by Anthony Valerio

Vincent Panella


Love In Action

From the Hands

of Our Fathers

Elizabeth Hill


SCREENplay

Their Finest

Lawrence Klepp


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Rights and privileges 

Jeri Rose


Open Mind

Does Lifestyle Matter more than Race?

Offie Wortham


Love In Action

Robin in the rain

Elizabeth Hill


The First Glass

Luck

Vincent Panella


Vermont Diary

Change of Season


Selected Letters

Immigrants in Vermont

Philip B. Scott, Governor


Old Lady Blog

The language I speak

is a language of grief

Toni Ortner


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Tarnished Gold

Jeri Rose


Monkey’s Cloak

Other voices

Charles Monette


SCREENplay

Elle

Lawrence Klepp


An A-musing Life

The Great Exodus-Salamanders and Passover Crossings

Nanci Bern


An A-musing Life

One Sip at a Time

Nanci Bern


Love In Action

This Land

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

The British Aren’t Coming — Alas


Open Mind

But The Goalposts Keep Moving!

Offie Wortham


Meanderings

‘Beware the ides of March’

Charles Monette


Write On!

Grey Tower

Phil Innes


The First Glass

Writing like a Painter

Vincent Panella


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Racism vs Sexism

Jeri Rose


Monkey’s Cloak

Ice floes slow

Charles Monette


Urban Naturalist

The Sanctuary in Late Winter:

a Long-Deferred Visit to Hogle Offers Rewards and Raises Concerns

— part 2 —

Lloyd Graf


Love In Action

Mein Yertle

Elizabeth Hill


SCREENplay

Lion

Lawrence Klepp


Urban Naturalist

The Sanctuary in Late Winter:

a Long-Deferred Visit to Hogle Offers Rewards and Raises Concerns

— part 1 —

Lloyd Graf


Meanderings

White as Snow

Charles Monette


Love In Action

People Power in Pink

Elizabeth Hill


Open Mind

Populism

Offie Wortham


Meanderings

White Buffalo in the Sky

Charles Monette


Monkey’s Cloak

Venus Smiled

Charles Monette


An A-musing Life

A resolute spirit

Nanci Bern


The First Glass

For the Birds

Vincent Panella


Love In Action

New Year’s Reflections on

“Charlotte’s Web”

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

Spiritual Theft in the

Year of the Monkey


SCREENplay

Manchester by the Sea

Lawrence Klepp


Meanderings

White Mountain

Charles Monette


The First Glass

San Diego, Ocean Beach – November 17, 2016

Vincent Panella



Vermont Views Magazine


A unique community supported cultural magazine exploring Quality of Life and Spirit of Place in our bio-region, with extraordinary photographs, 22 regular columnists plus feature articles, galleries & essays, new articles and photos every day. 100s more articles in the Archive.






Contact the magazine HERE

 


PHOTO OF THE DAY


Et in Walmart ego


Photographer: Phil Innes


If not in, then over. Emerging from the place where no natural colors are permitted to exist, I paused, looked up, and there it was. I was the only person looking, instead people were looking at me, as if they had seen the sky before and couldn’t understand the fuss. 


PASSAGES


Ted Hughes

Text selections by Vermont Views


The only calibration that counts is how much heart people invest, how much they ignore their fears of being hurt or caught out or humiliated. And the only thing people regret is that they didn't live boldly enough, that they didn't invest enough heart, didn't love enough. Nothing else really counts at all.


...imagine what you are writing about. See it and live it. Do not think it up laboriously, as if you were working out mental arithmetic. Just look at it, touch it, smell it, listen to it, turn yourself into it. When you do this, the words look after themselves, like magic.


The dreamer in her Had fallen in love with me and she did not know it. That moment the dreamer in me Fell in love with her and I knew it.


And that's how we measure out our real respect for people—by the degree of feeling they can register, the voltage of life they can carry and tolerate—and enjoy. End of sermon. As Buddha says: live like a mighty river. And as the old Greeks said: live as though all your ancestors were living again through you.



Read more PASSAGES >>>


Recent Passages By: Ted Hughes, Harold Wilson, Charles Dickens, Toni Morrison, Iris Murdoch,  David Hockney, Allen Ginsberg, Abigail Adams, Thomas Hardy, John Ruskin, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Amy Lowell, Bernardo Bertolucci, Buffy Sainte-Marie, John Keats, David Niven - Actor, David Niven - PhD, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Joan Didion, Pablo Casals, Geoffrey Chaucer, Muddy Waters, Aretha Franklin, Dorothy Maclean Read their work here



VERMONT AUTHORS REVIEWED


Leath Tonino,  Trinity University Press, 2018.

Reviewed by Laura Stevenson


Debut collection of essays from a young writer celebrating Vermont


The animal in the title is a creature Aristotle invented in The Poetics (7B) to demonstrate that an observer of a gigantic object could see only its parts, and thus lost perception of its "unity and wholeness." Tonino implicitly compares Vermont to this animal; his twenty essays, collected from periodicals published between 2011 and 2017, portray his adventures and observations in all parts of the state. Together, they also portray his impossible yearning to experience the whole by feeling "the infinite invitation that is the terrain of home."


Young and vigorous, Tonino is an enthusiastic adventurer. "Seven Lengths of Vermont," for example, opens with his vow, upon returning from several years "bumming around the West," to rediscover his native Vermont by touring it in seven different ways in the course of a year. The reader (presumably ensconced on a sofa) then becomes his vicarious companion as he hikes the length of the Long Trail, hitch-hikes around the state in over thirty rides; completes a three-week, 300-mile ski trek along the Catamount Trail; bikes through the state in a tour of some 500 miles; paddles 260 miles in a canoe trek along the Connecticut River; swims, in ten days, the length of Lake Champlain; and finally, climbs into a friend's small plane for a two-hour “vast and fast” flyover of the whole state. At the end of the year, Tonino has experienced parts of Vermont from many angles and at many different speeds in an attempt to understand the whole.


<extract, read on>


Read the full review and other reviewed titles in this column.

The Devil in the Valley — Castle Freeman, Jr.

Vermont Exit Ramps II — Neil Shepard and Anthony Reczek

Half Wild: Stories — Robin MacArthur

A Refugee's Journey: A Memoir — Walter Hess

Vermont Non-GMO Cookbook — Tracey Medeiros

Robin MacArthur, Heart Spring Mountain.

Jackson Ellis, Lords of St. Thomas

Chris Bohjalian, The Flight Attendant

Beth Kanell, The Long Shadow

Kimberly Harrington, Amateur Hour: Motherhood in Essays and Swear Words

Jessie Haas, Rescue

Toni Ortner, Writing Shiva

Tony Weldon, Drunk in the Woods

Aesop Lake, Sarah Ward

The Animal One Thousand Miles Long: Seven Lengths of Vermont and Other Adventures. Leath Tonino



SHORTS


Hello Mary Jane

Vermont Views


STATISTIC: The July 2019 Gallup survey found that the likelihood to smoke marijuana varies significantly by gender, age, and political ideology. Men (15%) are more likely to smoke marijuana than women (9%). At 22%, 18- to 29-year-olds are the most likely age group to smoke marijuana -- about twice as likely as those between the ages of 30 and 64, and seven times as likely as adults older than 65.Liberals (24%) are six times more likely to smoke marijuana than conservatives (4%), and twice as likely as moderates (12%).


The Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement Act that would federally decriminalize marijuana passed the House Judiciary Committee in November 2019, but, with that bill yet to make it to the House floor and facing an uncertain future in the Senate, the use of marijuana remains illegal under federal law. Meanwhile, 33 states have legalized marijuana in some way for adults -- whether for medicinal or recreational use; however, only one of those states, Florida, is in the South, which is reflected in that region's lower rate of marijuana users.


Between 13% and 16% of adults across the East, Midwest and West smoke marijuana, versus 7% in the South.


Read More shorts



MEANDERINGS


Charles Monette


Early days of August, yet September was closing fast!  The forest seemed at ease in the aftermath of tropical storm Iaisias. Looked as if a windblown, rain-soaked tempest had delivered a welcome cleansing of Black Mountain.  Damage was minimal.  Small branches snapped down.  Clusters of leaves still green, held by twigs, scattered about.  The forest had an air of contentment about it.  I was happy to be walking into its reassuring calm.

   

Lao Tzu said, “Music in the soul can be heard by the universe.”

I thought in reverse, “the music of the universe was filling my soul.”


The sun came out gently as I entered, leaving the cool cloudy morning behind. 

Last evening’s rain had left droplets atop leaves on branches of trees... left, right, above… below.  Walking up the trail, I broke for some water, and to take it all in. Minutes passed.  The glistening wet beads were slowly shrinking.  Seemed some molecules were being absorbed into the leaves; others were evaporating in air.  With barely a breeze, the mountain felt calm and centered.  I was adopting its language.  A quiet confidence seeped my bones.


Again, Lao Tzu spoke to me: “Silence is a source of great strength.”


A little friend danced funnily at my legs; its black wings spotted orange seemed out of character.  A butterfly?  Nah, it was more moth-ish in size & demeanor.  Whatever, it seemed delighted to be in nectar sampling mode.


<extract> Read more of this and other articles by Charles Monette >>>



URBAN NATURALIST


Black Vultures

Lloyd Graf


I was headed N on Canal around 10 AM a few days ago and ducked onto Birge St for an end run around a semi- mediated slow-down. Just beyond the computer shop I saw the pair of Black Vultures pictured in the Sept 28 photo enthusiastically rooting away at an unidentified roadside  carcass.


Couple this sighting with the 2 Blacks commemorating this past July 4 with a patriotic raid on a yummy road-kill skunk by the driveway to  Triple T 's sheds, dumpsters and garbage truck bays along Hghwy 142's all purpose disposal corridor at the base of bluffs leading to Morningside Cemetery and  Rich's photo-documented sighting of 3 similarly engaged Blacks along Fuller back in DEC of ‘19.  — then throw in Oct 2018 southbound flyover of a trio of Blacks —  Walnut St St Michael school lot —    throw in one mix-up with turks when triple T dumpster must have been a bonanza.


Extract Read More of this and other articles by Lloyd Graf



3 to 5 minutes on racial justice, no thanks

by Offie Wortham


Dear Jessie or Tommy,


Just had to write the letter below for my sanity. I really want to be of service in the community, but watching events go down hill in Johnson, Vt and the country with regards to race relations is very depressing. Instead of having carefully conducted conversations around issues we have given in to dangerous name-calling and control by guilt-ridden whites and angry blacks. Where do we go from there? If you care to print my piece please include the picture. Just want people to know I am a person-of-color who likes Vermont very much, and wants to work with others who understand the democratic process.


Offie Wortham


Resigns from being considered to be on The Racial Justice Commission in Johnson. October 5th, 2020


    I have lived in Johnson for over 10 years, and in Vermont for over twelve. I came to Johnson to teach Sociology, Psychology, and Human Relations at Johnson State. Anyone interested in my qualifications to be a volunteer on a committee in Johnson can just type my name into GOOGLE and view the resume from Marist College.


    I volunteered for the Racial Justice Commission at the urging of a friend on the Johnson Village Select board. After participating in a ZOOM meeting 10/5/2002 I have decided to withdraw my name from the process of the selection for becoming a Commission member.  I could tell from listening to some commission members that they only wanted new members who shared their narrow political perspective in working on racial or ethnic problems in Johnson. I am a free thinker, registered as an Independent. It promised to be a humiliating and frustrating experience for me, to prove that I was going to be politically correct, which was of course impossible. I have been working over 50 years, professionally and in a volunteer capacity, to move our nation toward racial and economic justice everywhere I have lived.


    The allowing of only 3-5 minutes for a statement from a candidate is not how I think the selection process should be done. Interested candidates should be asked to submit a short resume or a list of volunteer activities where they have worked to bring people together religious, racial, economic, cultural, people in conversations to identify and resolve racial and ethnic problems in their community.


    I think I will stay in my retirement while I watch my fellow citizens find the kind of people they are looking for who agrees to with them, rather than choosing experienced independent thinkers who want to work with them in a democratic fashion to make Johnson a more friendly and less stressful village.


Sincerely, Offie Wortham


Read More of this column >>>



WRITE WALK


Jolene - A Short-Story told in Parts

Part 2

Susan Cruickshank


Mama didn’t knock when she entered Jolene’s room. It wasn’t that she was barging in, but that Jolene never shut her door, and that was what Mama was saying as she awkwardly balanced the tray that held Jolene’s afternoon snack. A cold glass of lemonade with bobbing ice-cubes that made a hallowed sound as they bumped up against the glass stood next to two oatmeal cookies that had just come out of the oven, whose familiar aroma had beat Mama up the stairs.


“Land-sakes child, why do you have your door closed? Are you sick?”


The words trailed off as the ice cubes in the glass of lemonade knocked together.  Mama froze, her mouth slack-jawed, her eyes taking in Jolene’s opened suitcase half-full of clothes at the bottom of her bed.


Jolene felt the fire of her betrayal burn on her cheeks as she stepped forward to take the tray from Mama’s now shaking hands and put it safely on the bureau behind her. She turned around to see her Mama’s shocked face, which was beginning to cave under the weight of her fear and confusion.


“Mama, let me explain,” Jolene said as she eyed her bed for a place to guide her mother to sit, but seeing the suitcase, thought the reading chair over in the corner with pink floral upholstery was the better choice. As Jolene ushered Mama over to the chair, it was only when she had settled her into a seated position, and Jolene had turned around that she realized that the suitcase was in direct line with her mother’s vision. Jolene sighed.


“What is this, Jolene? I don’t understand. Do you have plans that I don’t know about? Did you tell Papa? What is this, Jolene?”


Jolene’s Mama rhymed off the questions more to herself than to her daughter, trying to piece together the inconceivable. Finally, when finding no reasonable explanation, she stopped talking and looked up at her daughter––begging her with her eyes for reassurance and clarity. 


“I got into school, Mama. I was accepted to Purdue University.”


<Extract> Read More of this and other articles by Susan Cruickshank >>>



ARCHETYPAL HIPPIE SPEAKS


Toward Restoring the Republic

Jeri Rose


Anna Von Reitz has a lot on the ball, she however says that religion makes law and therefore turns to the Bible..but there are laws of nature and nature is made by the living God and those who do not know-- the atheists-- can live by that law as how we understand that law is reason able and does not require religion that adopts the premise of God as authority to make laws that are based on dogma and the need of the priests to control the people...we can see that murder, theft, false witness are what destroys society and even marital infidelity...because we are humans not lions with a pride nor sheep and cattle with a herd ..we have had to progress from the authority of male might makes right to an intelligent authority for the sake of our social integrity. We have never had a woman king (president)...and the sexist view of women as unstable is just that --sexist, as bad a prejudice as racism. Melanin does not make a feeble mind nor estrogen an hysterical one. Our Republic claims separation of church and state and that is a principle worth remembering when we make our jural assemblies.


<extract> Read more Jeri Rose >>>



Finnish Fandango


R & B IN THE US

Anneli Karniala


     No, it's not Rhythm & Blues.


     It's Racism and Bigotry.  Yes, right here in the US of A. Make no mistake, both do exist and have existed here and in many parts of the world for centuries. Have we made any positive progress? You decide.


     Individual racism, seen as an individual's overt discrimination of others based on their skin color or race, upended the first US colonies ...first, against this country's Indigenous People and their lands. And it continues against them. Then in the treatment of Africans shipped here to be sold and to exist as slaves to white colonists. Black Americans attest to the continued unfair and abusive treatments they must endure. The number of horrific lynchings and killings of black Americans through the past many decades continue to this day, as does racial profiling by the police.


     Racism regarding Asian Americans has long existed in the US. Our vast expanses of railroads were built by Chinese people who were humiliated and restricted in their lives. During WWII Japanese Americans faced internment for 4 years in one of the 10 detention camps in the US. There have been instances in these last months of Asian Americans being spat upon, punched, and called racial slurs because the coronavirus originated in China and the man in the White House continues to derogatorily call it the "China virus" -- blatant racism.


     Today Mexicans in our Western states fear for their lives due to the xenophobic utterances and actions of top politicians and the entire 'build a wall' hype and paranoia.

     Racism has side-kicks in condemnation, hatred, and violence. Is that what we want?

     What happened to "...all men are created equal..." in the U.S. Declaration of Independence?  Equality.


     Institutional or systemic racism is racism that is so embedded in society that it is accepted as 'normal'.


Extract Read more of this and other articles by  Anneli Karniala



LOVE IN ACTION


Elizabeth Hill


"Women will have achieved true equality when men share with them the responsibility of bringing up the next generation."

~RBG


She was the first female Jewish member of the US Supreme Court. According to Jewish tradition, her passing on the eve of Rosh Hashanah indicates that she was a Tzaddik, a person of great righteousness. Ruth Bader Ginsberg’s entire Peaceful Warrior life was a testament to exactly that. 


Yes, it is true that our world has lost that Giant Beam of Light that radiated from her tiny earth-body, however, her RBG effect will and must live on.


RBG was a force to be reckoned with, fighting always for justice and equality for all, especially women. She was known for her remarkable ability to hold her ground, and often even changed minds of others. 


“Every now and then it helps to be a little deaf...That advice has stood me in good stead- 

not simply in dealing with my marriage, but in dealing with my colleagues.”

~RBG


Extract... Read More of this column and others by Elizabeth Hill >>>




AN A-MUSING LIFE


A Tale for Today

Nanci Bern


When gratitude is the most difficult to find, it is the time we need it the most. Today feels bleak to many, hard and scary. Reaching toward being thankful can seem like a monumental task for which we need the nurturing presence of grace.


We are in the holy hands of the Jewish New Year-The High Holy Days. We look back at the year coming to its end, and we look toward the year about to begin. We do tshuvah, known to most as ‘repentance’, to atone for our short fallings. But tshuvah really means ‘to return’. We are invited to return to the welcoming love that the Divine, Nature, all the Beloveds in our lives(that means all of us which now may seem a daunting task), and Ourselves (another difficult place for many to be) that we may have turned away from and created a disconnected space in our spirits.


So ‘tshuvah’ means to return to being connected so we feel whole again. When we ‘return’, we ‘connect’, or rather we ‘re-connect’ to what we have been separated from.


Read more Nanci Bern



WATER’S EDGE


Arriving

Nicola Metcalf


I saw her going

And ran to get my brothers.

We stood and watched, heartstruck in our loss

in her high ceilinged bedroom

with its elegant pink flowered wall paper, plush pale carpet, and

sliding glass doors opening to the ocean’s view

she slipped away forever.

A few hours earlier the nurse had laid her hand on her forearm arm and said, “Rona, you’re doing just fine”.

Like you would to a woman in labor

Reassuring her the way was open, and she was welcome.


<extract> Read more Nicola Metcalf >>>



OLD LADY BLOG


August 12, 2020

Toni Ortner

  

I guess you could call it a flotilla. but most were strangers. When it began six months ago, there were all sorts of boats, so you could see the difference in socio economic class by the type of boat. There were dories, sloops, ketches, and schooners, small and large motorboats, pleasure yachts. Catamarans, and houseboats; after six months there was nothing left but thousands of identical rowboats, some with one occupant others holding two. I did not see any children. All of us wore the required masks even those who had refused originally declaring it was their right to do as they wished regardless of scientific evidence.  The masks were actually quite colorful, not just the KN 95 white ones used by medical worker but all sorts of crazy even humorous designs red tulips painted onto black masks, zebra stripes, cheetah fur, Some people used masks that must have been left over from Halloween: witches, fairies, Cyclops, vampires, bats. Some mornings when I opened my eyes and stretched out my stiff limbs, the masks almost made me smile.


The National Guard boats came by less frequently with heavy cartons filled with Cabot cheeses, fresh lettuce, tomatoes, bread, pears and apples.  Boxes of saltines were prized; the trouble was there was no protection when it rained so crackers were ruined. Some boats had plastic raincoats or umbrellas stretched across the bows like little tents, so those people had a dry place to store food.  I did not want to think what would happen if the National Guard stopped coming.  At the moment there were no dead bodies floating in the rowboats nearby, but I had seen 15.  The bodies lay in the bottom of the boats decaying, and the stench was the worst. An elderly man dressed all in black came by the boats that held the deceased and pulled the bodies into the sea. He must be a priest.


Read More of this and other articles by Toni Ortner >>>



DAIRY HOME COMPANION


A shut-down column for the Plague Year 2020.                    

  

It’s like a song you can’t get out of your head, except its new car names. If you think you are stir crazy, then read on for crazier. Here is a list of manufacturers and names I gave their 2021 models:—


GMC        Brutus Hevy Dooty

Ford        MF Vigilante

Subaru    Love Childe

Dodge    Bullet

KIA        Klueless

Toyota     Purrer Tourer

Hyundai    Plain Spoke

Hummer    Donald F

Tesla        Smart Ass

BMW         Uber Alles

Lexus        Lordy, Lordy

Mercedes    Smirk

Honda        Blanda


Of course you can do better.


<extract> Read more Dairy Home Companion



MONKEY’S CLOAK


Listening to vibrations

Charles Monette                     

                                                                                  

eight suns equal releases in an instant

shockwave spreading

spreading out from two black holes merging


signal sent seven billion years ago

rattling laser detectors

LIGO VIRGO’s super-sensitive-gravitational-wave-detection-system


gravity’s pull so strong

matter had collapsed on itself

now nothing, not even light escaped



<extract> Read more Monkey’s Cloak



Pandemic Journal


An Introduction to the

Graphic Journal Slide Show

Linda Rubinstein


For many, a journal is a private place. Perhaps you can recall that the leatherette-covered diaries we kept as children came with lock and key. It was as close to a mental “room of one’s own” that we  could muster at ten or twelve years of age. It was where we recorded our pain and plans, our crushes and hopes, and our observations.. But a child I no longer am.


What drives my decades old practice of keeping word-and-image journals? I began in the late 1970’s during a four month stay in Pamplona, Spain. I needed an outlet for the challenges of living in another culture so I bought a sketch book and began to draw. Once this creative pathway opened, images started pouring out. That early work was all personal, done for me. I came home to find a new genre had surfaced—Artist Books—my muse had found her home. And so, starting with the comfort of the personal, I began the Pandemic Journal.


<extract>  Go to Pandemic Journal by Linda Rubinstein to watch the slide show>>>



SELECTED LETTERS


Rob Mitchell — Murfreesboro,Tennessee


  No idea is more fundamental to Americans' sense of themselves as individuals and as a nation than Freedom. The central term in our political vocabulary, Freedom or Liberty, is deeply embedded in the documentary record of our history and the language of everyday life. The Declaration of Independence lists liberty among mankind's inalienable rights; the Constitution announces as its purpose to secure ‘Liberty's Blessings’. The United States fought the Civil War to bring about a new birth of Freedom, World War II for Freedom from fascist genocide, the Cold War to defend the Free World.


Americans' love of freedom has been represented by liberty poles, caps, and statues, and acted out throughout history by the burning of stamps and burning draft cards. The quest for Freedom by running away from slavery, and demonstrating for the right to vote. The idea of “Freedom” occupies a more prominent place in public and private discourse in the United States than elsewhere in the world. The ubiquitous American excuse invoked by disobedient children and assertive adults “it’s a free country” is not familiar in other societies. Every man in the street, white, black, red or yellow knows that this is 'the land of the free' and the ‘cradle of liberty.'


Perhaps because of its very ubiquity the history of Freedom is a tale of debates, disagreements, and struggles rather than a set of timeless categories or an evolutionary narrative toward a preordained goal. And the meaning of Freedom has been constructed not only in congressional debates and political treatises, but on plantations and picket lines and in city streets and college campuses. If the pursuit of freedom has been a battleground throughout our history, so too has been the definition of those entitled to enjoy its blessings.


The United States, founded on the premise that Liberty is an entitlement of all humanity, undeniably deprived many of its own people of freedom. It has been through battles at the boundaries, the efforts of racial minorities, women, workers, and other groups to secure freedom, as they understood it, that the meaning of freedom has been both deepened and transformed. The concept extends now into realms for which it was not originally intended. Time and again in our history, the definition of Freedom has been transformed by the demands of excluded groups for inclusion. 


  The glorification of Freedom as the essential characteristic of American life opened the door for others to seize on the language of Freedom for their own purposes. Most striking was the civil rights movement, with its freedom rides, freedom schools, freedom marches, and the insistent cry “freedom now”.


When Martin Luther King, Jr. ended his great oration on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial with the words, “free at last, free at last thank God almighty, I’m free at last,” he was not referring to getting the government off his back or paying low taxes. Freedom for blacks meant empowerment, equality, recognition as a group and as individuals. Most white Americans believe that Freedom is something they possess, and that some outside force is trying to take away. Most African-Americans view Freedom not as a possession to be defended, but as a goal yet to be achieved.


<Extract> Read more of this and other letters to Vermont Views >>>



THE FIRST GLASS


Semmelweis — a book review

Vincent Panella


To call this book prescient is an understatement. To say it resonates with the movement for women’s rights and also with the Covid-19 pandemic, is also an understatement. Anthony Valerio, whose books of fiction and nonfiction all keenly sense the ironies of human nature, has recreated the sad but tragic life of a man before his time —  a  Hungarian scientist and physician whose research in the mid-1800’s saved thousands of women’s lives. Doctor Ignaz Semmelweis, obsessed with discovering why so many pregnant women died of childbed or puerperal fever, concluded that simple hygiene such as washing one’s hands could slow or even prevent the spread of this deadly virus. Unfortunately, he and his theory would be denied recognition by jealous colleagues who who did everything possible to end his career and pervert his accomplishments. Valerio gives us a deep look into the medical world of Vienna and elsewhere at a time when the stethoscope was just coming into use as physicians were still putting their ears to a patient’s chest to hear a heartbeat; when autopsies were performed without the basic personal hygiene practiced today.


Semmelweis, who never received his due, was a little known but consequential figure in medical history and Valerio writes his story with a clear eye. This was a life that inspired such writers as Ibsen, Celine and Vonnegut, all who wrote about him directly or indirectly, and who recognized the universal story of genius denied by jealousies that caused more human suffering. Who would have known today’s obvious fact that washing one’s hands could help prevent the spread of a virus? One man, Semmelweis, whose up and down career suffered the whim of superiors, was obsessed with discovering the cause of high death rates among pregnant women lying in hospitals. By exhaustive experimentation he concluded that those performing autopsies with their unwashed hands often reeking of cadaverous fluids, were spreading childhood or puerperal fever – a disease known since ancient times.


 This is a compelling and cautionary tale of a man before his time, whose proven theory that simple hygiene could save lives perhaps cost his own life. Because of turf wars among his colleagues, he was denied recognition. His ideas were trashed as quackery despite the data to back them up. His career faltered.  His physical and mental health declined as resistance to his theories was  unrelenting. At a certain point, and perhaps because of these disappointments, Semmelweis suffered a nervous breakdown, was committed to an asylum, and after being beaten violently by guards, died from his wounds at age forty-seven. Valerios’s talent is to recognize the irony of genius denied, and to bring it home.


<extract>  Read More of this and other articles by Vincent Panella >>>



VERMONT DIARY


Phil Innes


There is  a wicked inclination in the current age to skip personal responsibility and blab on in the newspapers at extraordinary length about the failure of the Fathers — a Freudian dream-cast of projections about fathers and authorities. Not only does the government get it in the chest for promising things which no twelve year old would credit possible, but no fifty year old would credit as even desirable. Doesn’t matter if you are Left or Right to understand this.


This used to be a community where citizens who had the wherewithal that took responsibility for those who had not. It was not desirable that government should fix things in Vermont when citizens could do as well or better themselves, and volunteerism was a part and even expected part of the social scene. Second-home ownership has not helped in this with Vermont being the second highest state in the Union for second-home ownership, including 81%, Quechee with 69% and Proctorsville.


But for those who live here regularly the time to have volunteered a contribution and get an orientation to it was last year. With some sort of acknowledged and sometimes measured training toward being competent in a skill, plus a regular attendance at a critical forum which makes a difference, a couple of months training at a few hours per week would have qualified anyone to attend on emergencies rather than wax large about the paternal and inadequate government in the newspapers, however efficient the government is, since the government cannot govern what the citizens are unwilling to perform.


[Captioned is Loaves and Fishes Community Kitchen in Brattleboro]


Otherwise what do you personally find yourself useful in contributing that is now accepted and included by a social body?


Read More VERMONT DIARY >>>


IN BETWEEN


BRIDGING BACK TO LOVE

Julia Ferrari


In this tumult of times, when things are uncertain, unknown, frightening and surreal, what do we know with truth and how can we utilize what we are experiencing toward living a better human life?


During trying times the best or the worst of us comes out. I find myself becoming aware of the best that such trials can bring to us. Besides noticing the person who ignores the sign to buy just one package of toilet paper and grabs two, or the man who buys two bottles of rubbing alcohol only to sell them online later for 17 times what he paid for them, I also feel and see the more positive possibilities amid the restlessness and fear: the open caring ability of the human heart. Each of us can choose how we weather this storm. We can become more self-focused, falling into greed and the worry of limitation or we can realize that we all have enough—enough love to give kindness, enough patience to give consideration, enough of a scarce product to let someone else have some and share.


Life and death experiences bring us closer to our essential selves as all the frivolities drop away from the necessities. In the face of such circumstances we can see what is really important through all the clouds of chaos and bring into focus what is essential in our lives. Yes, we all want to protect ourselves and our loved ones, but it is important to see that this reflex is part of a greater concern for the whole community. We can choose to feel only fear or we can also feel deep concern for each other’s wellbeing.  This is one way to grow as a human being. 

 

Extract Read more Julia Ferrari



WRITE ON !


Why is Martin Luther King Day a day off from school?

by Offie Wortham


Today I had the opportunity to try to answer this question to my 8-year old grandson. He did not have any idea who Dr. King really was, and what life was like for people-of-color in the United States when Dr. King was a boy or a young man. Living in Vermont today, he had no knowledge of the history of the racism and violence in the country in the past against people-of-color.


How does one begin to explain that at one time it was against the law for a black person and a white person to marry or even live together? Can a young person today even comprehend that people were actually killed for looking at, or whistling at a person of a different race?


I felt I had to begin with the fact that when I was in high school in 1956 there was no such thing as interracial dating. And this was in Westchester County in New York! When I went to college in Ohio the barber refused to cut my hair and it led to demonstrations where water hoses were used to prevent a riot. A movie theater refused to sell me a ticket because they said I had to be a member. Over 200 students mobilized and demonstrated before he admitted Negroes. In the South in the 50’s students sat at lunch counters while people spit in their food and beat them off the seats and hit them with baseball bats until they were hospitalized. Thousands of black people were beaten, hung from trees, castrated, doused with gasoline, and set on fire… because they dared to violate some racist rule or law.


<Extract>

Read More of this article >>>



OPEN MIND


So far it’s been a good run

Offie Wortham


<extract> After attending 7 other colleges and getting degrees from 5 of them, including a Master’s and a PhD, I married four times, had three partners, (for a total of 55 years) and around 30-40 girlfriends before, between, and after these committed relationships. I once had a stable of 5, and had a lot of fun with my hobby. From two of the marriages I have three wonderful daughters, who have given me seven beautiful grandchildren.


Eventually, there were over 60 cars, including a new Porsche convertible, a red Jaguar, three BMW’s, an MG convertible, three Mercedes, an Alpha Romeo, a jet black businessman’s BMW motorcycle; and five other convertibles. Have lived in seven homes and over 20 apartments in New York, Atlanta, New Jersey, Philadelphia, Vermont, Ohio, Santa Monica, and San Francisco. Have been to Paris, Switzerland, London, Italy, Spain, and the Bahamas so far.


I was a Community Organizer and Director of many large programs on college campuses and in several major cities and national human and civil rights organizations. I had my own office and lab conducting experiments at IBM’s top “Blue Sky” research facility in the world. As a Senior Electronic Research Technician, or “Rocket Scientist”, I did final tests on the Saturn Missile at Douglas Missile & Space prior to launches in the California deserts preparing for the first moon landings.


I worked closely with the FBI in 1971 initially developing the obscure concept of “Psychological Profiling.” Around that time I also collaborated with the American Cancer Society to promote a button I conceived reading “HELP! Your smoking is hazardous to my health” which began the movement against second-hand smoke worldwide. I had dinner and dialogue with Eleanor Roosevelt, Malcolm X, Muhammad Ali, and Coretta King. I lived 6 months with Pete Seeger and Toshie. Went with Harry Belafonte and 7 students to confront President Eisenhower at the White House about his resistance to support the 1954 Supreme Court Decision on school desegregation.


But like any long journey, there have been some rough times. I’ve had cancer and lost my prostate. Fell on ice and had serious brain surgery. Broke my neck and lost a front tooth playing high school football. The late discovery of the broken neck at a special examination at West Point prevented me from becoming the youngest person ever in the AF Aviation Cadets and possibly the first black in the Air Force Academy. I had scored the highest score ever on the AFOQT which is the test all graduates of the Air Force Academy, West Point, Annapolis, and OCS must pass to get admitted into pilot or astronaut training. I was only 20.


<extract>    Read More Offie Wortham >>>



Real Vermont Stories


Vermont “Maternity Homes”

by Beth Kanell


It began with a postcard. My husband Dave (who passed last April) collected them: colorful Vermont scenes, yes, but more importantly the black-and-white ones from the late 1800s and early to mid 1900s that showed actual scenes, especially in the Northeast Kingdom. There are hundreds of St. Johnsbury and Lyndonville images in his collection—but, proportional to both town size and events that seemed worth marketing as photographs, there are very few from, say, Granby or Victory in Essex County.

Or from Concord.

Dave plunged me into a new research project when he found a card labeled “Quimby Maternity Home, Concord, Vt.” His knowledge of postcard publishers and some quick investigation prompted him to added the information “1949–1953.”

As we, and then I, probed further, we found more than 50 documented births that took place, not just in the Quimby (also called Graves, for nurse Ardella “Nana” Graves — illustrated) Maternity home, but also in the Austin Maternity Home in the same small town (this one, run by Leah Virginia Austin). And both were clearly “supervised” by the local doctor, Frederick Russell Dickson, M.D.

“Maternity homes” in the rest of America seem to have often been places for unwed mothers to give birth and send their babies out for adoption. Dave and I found a single request from an adoptee born in 1946 at a Concord maternity home for clues to his parentage. But that turned out to be the exception. Online access led us to birth certificates of many babies simply born in these more supportive, medically encouraged “homes.” Mothers could arrive a day early, stay a few days afterward, have a break from parenting and get a good start with the new arrival.

But such maternity homes were not well documented. In the case of the ones in Concord, Dr. Dickson worked under contract for the local paper mill, which provided him space for a “dispensary,” and cared for many more illnesses, injuries, and preventive cases than the babies being born—and no records from the two maternity homes have been located.

So Dave and I went to local Facebook “pages” and “groups,” where residents current and past share their memories. To our astonishment, we discovered another maternity home that took patients at the same time period, the early 1900s, and it was about 20 miles from Concord, in Lyndonville, Vermont.


<Extract>

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How I Write


Vincent Panella

THE CHANNEL


These journal entries center on a fragment written forty-odd years ago. I recently found the pages typed on carbon paper, yet through all those years I mulled over the story and its possibilities – a confined setting, clear situation, very few characters, maybe a one-act, maybe a short story, but still no desire to get back in. This summer I re-entered the typescript and came up with a story line that might work: 


A young man named Larry heads for Hollywood with a copy of his first novel soon to be published. The premise of the novel is a young man’s affair with his father’s lover. Larry’s car breaks down in the Mojave just outside of Barstow. He ends up in a radiator shop and there he meets a Samaritan type called Fenwick, also a writer, and they talk about his novel, what he invented, what he remembered – what was ‘true to life - and that blurry line between art and lived experience.


The dated entries here are edited for clarity. The original fragment was page after page about his car breaking down on a long hill.....almost nothing about substance, character, motivation, etc. Forty years ago – like now – I’m still learning. It’s working title was Barstow, but gradually a theme emerged, and the title Hill of Dreams helped me shape it. The entries span two months of this year but I must have worked on the story twice as long as that. In most cases the journal entries prompt the writing of actual text, which is done on screen, on paper, and sometimes with an Olivetti.


 7/21/19 - Took a look at what I did to Barstow - still on the opening, how I chopped it to s - - -. Now all the car details are almost gone – the old V-8 burning oil, the crankcase ventilation valve, oil gauge idiot light, the retread tires because the character has so little money.


 7/22 -  Woke up thinking Bartow was f----- -  that the whole gambit is a cliche - Larry writes a novel based on life, sort of – the premise being that his main character has an affair with his father’s lover. Larry has rendered a real life experience into a novel – his novel is within this story. The story is that that Larry’s heading for Cali with a novel in which the central action is drawn from his life and a threat to his family’s privacy. And his car breaks down on the long hill outside of town.


 – and where a movie producer is interested in the novel as Larry imagines famous actors playing his family members and what their reaction might be.


 Then his car breaks down on the Hill of Dreams. Fenwick (name borrowed from a Boll story) takes him to a hotel while he waits for a new radiator. They have some yet to be written convo about his situation, what he's written about his father etc. In the end Larry drives off into the sunset, back up the hill of dreams. End of story.


 Scene: "I call it the Hill of Dreams," Fenwick said, They were sitting in the hotel lobby at a small bar and tables with a view of a garden and a raft of Eucalyptus trees.


Fenwick points out the similarity between Larry and the Okies generations back -  heading for a new life out west, beaten by the hill, or not beaten....Fenwick there to pick up the pieces.


Larry felt a little buzz from the whiskey, a comfortable feeling, the big room with its open windows along the wall was cool and comfortable without any air conditioning as was his room where he'd slept well and long, realizing that the past four nights he'd been sleeping in the back seat of the Pontiac.


<Extract>

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SCREENplay


Wildlife

Lawrence Klepp


Wildlife, the directorial debut of the actor Paul Dano, came and went quietly early this year, but it’s now available on streaming platforms, and it’s worth pursuing if you have a chance. In a year of outstanding female performers—Glenn Close, Olivia Colman, Viola Davis, Rachel Weisz, among others—the riveting work by Carey Mulligan in this film was largely overlooked. Based on a Richard Ford novel, the movie is set in a small town in Montana in 1960. The town, like many small Western towns, has a bleak, windswept, middle-of-nowhere ambience, but there’s a soaring mountain backdrop that is impressive in itself and lends the film a pathos of distance, a sense that life, or happiness, may be just over the horizon.


Mulligan and Jake Gyllenhaal play Jeanette and Jerry Brinson, a working-class couple in their mid-30s with a 14-year-old son, Joe (Ed Oxenbould). The family is barely making it financially but seems united and happy. But then Jerry gets fired from his job at a country club, having joined several members, at their invitation, for an off-hours game of golf and a drink afterward, thus violating club protocols. Jeanette, always smiling, always encouraging, is at first optimistic. She’s sure Jerry will quickly find another job. And, if necessary, she could work part-time, and they might move to a cheaper house, one even smaller and more nondescript than the one they’re renting.


<extract> Read More SCREENplay



WORLD & US ENERGY NEWS


Environment there and here

Special Environmental report by Phil Innes — Column George Harvey


In Iceland:

¶ Katrin Jakobsdottir, the 41-year-old chairwoman of the Left-Green Movement, has been elected Prime Minister of Iceland. One of the most well-liked politicians in Iceland, Katrín, a former education minister and avowed environmentalist, has pledged to set Iceland on the path to carbon neutrality by 2040. As Iceland’s fourth prime minister in only two years, Katrín will take office at a time when national politics have been tainted by public distrust and scandal. A democratic socialist, Katrín is viewed as a bridge-building leader that may lead the country towards positive, incremental change. “She is the party leader who can best unite voters from the left and right,” said Eva H. Onnudottir, a political scientist at the University of Iceland, according to the New York Times. “Because this coalition includes parties from the left to the right, their work will be more about managing the system instead of making ‘revolutionary’ changes.”


In an era when climate change is making it necessary for countries around the world to implement sustainable energy solutions, Iceland presents a unique situation. ... The story of Iceland's transition from fossil fuels may serve as an inspiration to other countries seeking to increase their share of renewable energy.


About 85% of all houses in Iceland are heated with geothermal energy. ... Renewable energy provided almost 100% of electricity production, with about 73% coming from hydropower and 27% from geothermal power.



In the USA:

¶ President Trump's first EPA Administrator, Scott Pruitt, resigned effective July 6, 2018, amid a series of scandals. Deputy Administrator Andrew Wheeler, a former coal industry lobbyist, started serving as acting administrator on July 9, 2018. Wheeler was confirmed as EPA Administrator on February 28, 2019.


The mission of EPA is to protect human health and the environment. EPA's purpose is to ensure that: ... the United States plays a leadership role in working with other nations to protect the global environment.


The EPA has 14,172 employees, and has a budget of $8,200,000,000.


<extract> Read More World & US Energy News



From The Archive


Evolution of democracy from economy to ecology

Editorial Essay


...Not too long ago these [energy] subjects were spoken of as ‘alternatives’, but in the chaotic energy scene of today they are currently only an alternative to chaos itself. One may scoff at specific proposed solutions, but the main problems can no longer be denied.


Elsewhere, Brattleboro as an influential hub to an extensive bio-region, a region without a name, is taking steps to implement a topic suggested by Wendell Berry in an essay he had published at Orion Press, Winter 2001. He titled the central essay The Idea of a Local Economy. This too, said Berry, is not an ‘alternative’ to anything but disempowerment. ‘Without prosperous local economies, the people have no power and the land no voice.’


Indeed, I remember William Irwin Thompson, founder of the Lindisfarne Foundation, New York City, saying much the same in 1982 — that the evolution of democracy will occur when we begin to shift from economy to ecology, thereby an intelligence of bio-regions provides the basis for action within the region, and Berry’s Local Economy is also the base of an enhanced local polity.


Certainly just being ‘aware’ of the difficulties in the world is altogether too passive and we might also consider a term coined by Buckminster Fuller in terms of the right way to harness our technology and economy; Imagineering.


<extract> From The Archive




SELECTED LETTERS


Not everyday a Vermont Views columnist has a book published. Here is Daybook 1 by Toni Ortner with reviews by Arlene Distler, Tim Mayo and Phil Innes


This would be Steinbeck if he hadn’t fooled around in other people’s kitchens. This is a full-score Cohen with two more notes, not reaching anywhere, but ever taking in. The words come humming out of the dark to shatter crystalline on the floor as sharp edged duo-tone fridge magnets familiar and mysterious as if designed by Paul Klee — not made in China or the Old Country, made in the Wild East of New York is more like it. There are hiding demons in the text waiting to pierce you, and there are non-resident angels flirting with sin.

—Phil Innes, Vermont Views Magazine


Read more of this and other letters to Vermont Views >>>




GALLERY ONE


A photographic essay on Devon and Cornwall

Anne Lenten, Ed.


A series of photographs about ‘another place’ collected by the remarkable photographer Anne Lenten — Notes by Phil Innes


#6 Mining conditions haven’t changed much in 100 years




See more photos in this article Gallery One >>>










GUEST ARTCLE


LETTERS FROM CUBA #15

Some sentences from Cuba

Mac Gander

It is dawn in La Habana and I am listening to Bob Marley’s “Rebel Music” as my wife Shanta sleeps in the next room and I mark the end of our third week here. One week to go. Travel is exhausting. There is no moment in which one does not wish to be awake.


I am thinking of the opening trope in Denis Johnson’s “Fiskadoro,” where he invokes Marley as one of the three great gods still left in the Florida Keys after a nuclear holocaust, a book that ends with a war-ship returning to those shores after a 90-year quarantine, from Cuba, a grey ship that is taller than the sky.





GUEST ARTICLE


LETTERS FROM CUBA #12

What lies beneath: Our stories our ghosts

Shanta Lee Gander

Who came first?  Europa or Europe?  With some research, I could get an answer, but the story of a girl who keeps dreaming about two continents fighting over her and who meets her fate and immortality with a God turned beautiful bull is an old one






NOW, HERE, THIS!




Its not over ‘til

Vermont Views


hey, at least its not going to get below freezing


— that is down here in the valley in Brattleboro, though not on the hills and not up North. Looks like Brattleboro is snow-free through Wednesday!





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